ADD 384: Addictions Theory and Practice is designed to provide students with an overview of current and emerging research/expertise in the field. The course will cover diverse definitions and understandings of addiction, as informed by current findings in the fields of neuroscience and social science. Pharmacology basics and the biological, psychological, social, spiritual and environmental dimensions of addiction will be reviewed from a number of perspectives. Current research on attachment, trauma and brain development will be examined in relation to addiction from both developmental and environmental perspectives. A critical examination of the link between policy and practice provides context for the emergence of recovery strategies such as harm reduction and motivational techniques. Special attention will be given to the role of colonization and stigma as it is experienced through ethnicity, gender and culture, and the important role of advocacy in this context.

This course will provide the student with an opportunity to examine personal goals, values and attitudes; develop and practice listening and responding skills, and become more aware of personal strengths and limitations. Designed to help gain self-understanding in order to be more effective in working with people. This course if offered on campus.

Provides the student with an opportunity to examine personal goals, values and attitudes; develop and practice listening and responding skills, and become more aware of personal strengths and limitations. Designed to help gain self-understanding in order to be more effective in working with people. This course if offered on campus.

Provides the student with an opportunity to examine personal goals, values and attitudes; develop and practice listening and responding skills, and become more aware of personal strengths and limitations. Designed to help gain self-understanding in order to be more effective in working with people. This course if offered on campus.

HSER 254, Core Concepts in Human Services introduces students to the concepts of theory and practice in Human Services and the interrelationship between the two.  A number of theoretical perspectives on change are explored from both a Child and Youth Care and Social Service Worker orientation, including multicultural, feminist, developmental and post modern perspectives.  Each of the theoretical perspectives studied offer a basis for understanding the helping relationship and personal change processes.  An emphasis will be placed on psychodynamic, humanist, cognitive/behavioural, systemic and solution-focused/narrative approaches to practice.

Human Service agencies are labour-intensive organizations which invest most of their financial resources in personnel who are engaged in delivering front-end or "hands-on" services. This course will explore the issues around the selection and supervision of staff and assist the participants to develop skills in managing staff in a way that will promote productivity while meeting the needs of these employees.

HSER 276, Issues in Youth will explore the issues that face those in adolescence and early adulthood in various societies. 'Adolescence' and 'early adulthood' are terms used to describe a time of life in which major developmental and social changes occur. An exploration of adolescence and early adulthood, and the issues that are unique to these stages of life in various societies will occur. Students will be exposed to theories of adolescence, issues of gender, sociological explanations of existing issues, and to local and international programs designed to address these issues.